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Friday, September 13, 2013

365: Dorothy Wordsworth, the London Eye, and me

Day 256

Taken from the top of the London Eye. This site has a panorama view.

That's the Westminster Bridge in the picture, and we walked over it a couple of times during our week in London. We walked by the plaque with Wordsworth's poem, passed by the streetsellers of bent-wire jewelry, carmelized peanuts, cheap souvenirs, and the men baiting tourists like us with shell games. We paused and watched the ferries and the on/off boats as they docked, then launched, and glided underneath us. We took pictures of Parliament and Big Ben, sharing the awe of millions of visitors before us, trying to capture the weight of history in a snapshot.

Wordsworth's sister wrote:
... we left London on Saturday morning at ½ past 5 or 6, the 31st July (I have forgot which) we mounted the Dover Coach at Charing Cross. It was a beautiful morning. The City, St pauls, with the River & a multitude of little Boats, made a most beautiful sight as we crossed Westminster Bridge. The houses were not overhung by their cloud of smoke & they were spread out endlessly, yet the sun shone so brightly with such a pure light that there was even something like the purity of one of nature's own grand Spectacles ” —Dorothy Wordsworth, The Grasmere Journal, Saturday 31st July 1802
I can't help but think Dorothy would have loved our view from the London Eye, where there was nothing in our view except London. It was a beautiful evening, the city, St. Pauls, the river and a multitude of boats made a most beautiful site. The city was not overhung by a cloud of smoke, and it spread out endlessly, yet the sun shone so brightly with such a pure light that there was even something like purity of one of nature's one grand spectacles.

Why reinvent the wheel, when nothing much changes?





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